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Hey folks —

THIS IS HAPPENING!! Today, even!  So here’s the text from the Wordsmith’s FB event:

“By this point, we’re certain you already know what we’re all about: putting on free poetry events for the campus community while mobilizing the student body to take part in social justice advocacy! We also run the slam team! This weekend is about bringing those things together in harmony and treating you all to an unforgettable set of shows. So, if you want more details about the slam itself, visit our tumblr page (http://uncwordsmiths.tumblr.com/). Otherwise, here’s the breakdown:

TONIGHT!! Friday Night: workshop with nationally-renowned poet and spoken word artist Theresa Davis (sponsored by Feminist Students United)  7 PM

Campus Y Seminar rooms 207 and 208

FREE

Light refreshments will be served

***Sign up at this link: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1Bytum-_pDWTz5ICrwDnjddl6OUc7uaplV3wfDFeeYeM/viewform***

Saturday night: IT ALL GOES DOWN! The entire slam season comes down to this one final Grand Slam to decide which 5 student poets will compete on the UNC slam team that will represent the University at Nationals in Colorado.

Doors open at 7 PM

Tate-Turner-Kuralt Auditorium (information about directions and parking here: http://ssw.unc.edu/about/directions)
(Grand Slam is co-sponsored by Feminist Students United)
FREE FOR ALL, suggested donation of $5

You read right: IT’S ALL FREE!! Don’t miss out!

This is our way of thanking you ALL for supporting us and the causes we’ve championed in the past, and those to come in the future. So please come enjoy this weekend with us!”

 

So what are you waiting for?!?!?!  You’d better sign up on that Google Doc for the Theresa Davis workshop and click here for the FB EVENT PAGE!!!

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I can’t find a transcription of this speech that is correct.  All of the versions available leave out critical bits of this speech.  They leave out the mention of spending too much on military bases instead of bases of genuine concern, etc.  A typical example of the attempt to de-radicalize the good Rev. King.   Listen to this in its entirety.

“My third reason moves to an even deeper level of awareness, for it grows out of my experience in the ghettoes of the North over the last three years — especially the last three summers. As I have walked among the desperate, rejected and angry young men I have told them that Molotov cocktails and rifles would not solve their problems. I have tried to offer them my deepest compassion while maintaining my conviction that social change comes most meaningfully through nonviolent action. But they asked — and rightly so — what about Vietnam? They asked if our own nation wasn’t using massive doses of violence to solve its problems, to bring about the changes it wanted. Their questions hit home, and I knew that I could never again raise my voice against the violence of the oppressed in the ghettos without having first spoken clearly to the greatest purveyor of violence in the world today — my own government. For the sake of those boys, for the sake of this government, for the sake of hundreds of thousands trembling under our violence, I cannot be silent.”

……..

“A true revolution of values will soon cause us to question the fairness and justice of many of our past and present policies. n the one hand we are called to play the good Samaritan on life’s roadside; but that will be only an initial act. One day we must come to see that the whole Jericho road must be transformed so that men and women will not be constantly beaten and robbed as they make their journey on life’s highway.

True compassion is more than flinging a coin to a beggar; it is not haphazard and superficial. It comes to see that an edifice which produces beggars needs restructuring. A true revolution of values will soon look uneasily on the glaring contrast of poverty and wealth. With righteous indignation, it will look across the seas and see individual capitalists of the West investing huge sums of money in Asia, Africa and South America, only to take the profits out with no concern for the social betterment of the countries, and say: “This is not just.”

It will look at our alliance with the landed gentry of Latin America and say: “This is not just.” The Western arrogance of feeling that it has everything to teach others and nothing to learn from them is not just. A true revolution of values will lay hands on the world order and say of war: “This way of settling differences is not just.” This business of burning human beings with napalm, of filling our nation’s homes with orphans and widows, of injecting poisonous drugs of hate into veins of people normally humane, of sending men home from dark and bloody battlefields physically handicapped and psychologically deranged, cannot be reconciled with wisdom, justice and love. A nation that continues year after year to spend more money on military defense than on programs of social uplift is approaching spiritual death.”

I have pulled some quotes from this speech but reading or listening to the speech in its entirety is the only way to do this speech justice.  Please do.  Here is the speech in full text w/an audio: http://www.americanrhetoric.com/speeches/mlkatimetobreaksilence.htm

Folks!!! FOLKS!! LOOOOKKK!!! An exciting opportunity to get together with ya radfolks and MAKE SHIT HAPPEN!

I know it’s tough to be politically conscious in this world, what with all the constant attacks on already marginalized folks and all, but the only thing that’s worse than this reality is the overwhelming feeling of HELPLESSNESS that accompanies a shit-avalanche like the one we’re seeing in North Carolina. There’s so much going on that I for one am still numb with confusion.  What was passed? In what secret midnight vote? Affecting whom? Closing down which clinics? Cutting which benefits? Wait – what happened to my right to vote?

And money = free speech still, right?

*cue cautiously optimistic, inspirational tune*

That’s why it’s important to arm yourself with education — not just about the issues and their effects, but what YOU — yes YOU!!! — can do to [resist the powers that be], [reverse the effects of damaging legislation] and [prevent this from happening again in the future].

Here’s a blurb from the [WIN] Conference event page:

“The [WIN] Conference will serve to educate the community about issues currently plaguing society. What this means is that we will have a bunch of awesome presenters teaching us about what is going on right now.

Learn more about current womyn’s issues such as reproductive rights/justice, politics, violence against womyn, and womyn in the media. Our keynote speaker is Monica Simpson, executive director of SisterSong. Organizations such as the Orange County Rape Crisis Center, Ipas, NARAL Pro-Choice North Carolina, and Lillian’s List will be presenting and tabling throughout the day!

Come out to the Womyn’s Issues Now [WIN] Conference
WHERE: Union in room 3408
WHEN: Saturday, January 25, 2014 from 9 AM – 5 PM!

We will serve free breakfast and lunch. You don’t want to miss this great event!

 

Space is limited so register NOW!

[WIN] Conference 2014 REGISTRATION

[WIN] Conference Event Page

Feedback: Projects for Fall 2013

Comments below or e-mails to uncfsu@gmail.com

Published in the Daily Tar Heel on April 10, 2013

TO THE EDITOR:

On Monday, Alert Carolina sent an informational message about charges of false report being filed against a sexual assault survivor by the UNC Department of Public Safety.

This message shocked me, given that Alert Carolina had not made an announcement about any reported sexual assaults on or near campus in the past several days.

The message explains that there was no “imminent threat” to the Carolina community following the assault, and that an alert would have compromised the integrity of the investigation.

I question the integrity of a sexual assault investigation that turns into a case against the reporting survivor within 48 hours of its initiation.

The informational message contradicts the Department of Public Safety’s encouragement of survivors to report sexual assault.

In this case, the survivor was burdened with proving that an assault occurred, and has now been charged with a crime for speaking out.

What significant interest should a false report have for the Carolina community that a sexual assault does not?

I cannot think of a clearer message to students, faculty and staff that survivors will be punished for speaking out.

Sarah-Kathryn Bryan ’15
Women’s and Gender Studies, Comparative Literature

http://www.dailytarheel.com/article/2013/04/uncs-alert-carolina-discouraged-reporting

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In the past several years we have seen incredible social movements spanning the globe in response to the still worsening economic crisis and punishing austerity measures that followed it. Young people, students, and workers are standing up to the abuses of a system bent on denying us a future. These forces, driven by greed, will continue a path of wealth accumulation for the few on the backs of the many. North Carolina is no different.

Wealthy right-wing donors bought the North Carolina legislature and put Tea Party conservatives in the driver’s seat of our state. Their program is clear: public education and services will face massive cuts, and the general welfare of our state will be undermined to benefit the richest few. From voting rights to women’s rights, those in power want to take us backwards. North Carolina families, students, and workers cannot afford this regressive agenda — and we will not accept it. It is more urgent than ever to build upon multi-issue, grassroots mobilization efforts in NC. Our state has a rich history of activism and resistance, and as in the past, students must serve as leaders in the fight for social justice. The time for organizing a powerful student movement is now!

On February 16th 2013, The NC-Student Power Union will be holding a statewide organizing conference in Raleigh, North Carolina—our state capital. This conference will bring together leaders of social justice organizations, university faculty, and most importantly, students like us for a day of education, inspiration, and action.

Instead of accepting a future shaped by low wage jobs, racism, and a warming planet, our generation is coming together to demand a world with opportunity for all people and justice for our earth—a world without fear of deportation, crushing debt, or heterosexist discrimination. Join the movement on February 16th. Help build student voice and student power to reclaim our education and create the state we want to live in.

Register for the Conference Today.

**This Post is part of a larger series of activist we should know**

“People have to be made to understand that they cannot look for salvation anywhere but to themselves” 

               -Ella Baker

As students, and certainly students in North Carolina, we have heard much about the Greensboro Sit-Ins and the Civil Rights Movement.  We heard about injustice—probably for only for a few days in our US History course—as if it happened, was discovered to be wrong, and then changed by a few super-humans who lead us to the promised land of equality before the law.  This reduced, linear reading of history leaves us with few lessons to carry forward—little to nourish ourselves as citizens in a world still yearning for people committed to make change and confront ever more entrenched oppressions.  These histories leave us merely with monuments to what was.  We look on them with reverence and wait for our next hero.

As seekers of justice we cannot be satisfied with the dominant narrative of history.  We must sharpen our eyes and dig through the past in hopes of finding the roots of our current struggles.  We must discover our ancestors, learn from their efforts, and carry forward their vision with ours.  We must look to groups like the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) and figures like Ella Jo Baker.

Ella Baker grew up near the North Carolina-Virginia border on what today we would call a cooperative farm.  Her parents believed in building community among African-Americans and thus she grew up surrounded by a large group of extended family that worked together and shared resources to sustain each other.  Out of this work Ms. Baker quickly gained a sense of collective struggle and a self-sufficient streak.  Her upbringing in this collectivist, deeply democratic setting informed her belief on the importance of radical democracy in organizing work.

Ella Baker went on to become a leading field organizer and director of the NAACP, founder of In Friendship, and the first organizer of Martin Luther King’s Southern Christian Leadership Conference.  She brought to all of these organizations perhaps the largest network of committed people built by any civil rights leader.  She left all of these organizations with a want for something that none of the major civil rights groups could give her: an organization that took seriously building a struggle which would uplift the voices of Black-Americans on the ground in the most dangerous areas of the southern United States while building long term leadership and attacking the roots of a society she believed did not meet the needs of working people.  In many ways, the nomadic nature of her activist career made her a perfect candidate to facilitate the convergence of young activists that came to be the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee.

As the sit-in movement was sweeping the country, Ella Baker used her influence within SCLC to solicit funds and organize a conference of the young activists to take place in April 1960 in Raleigh, North Carolina at Shaw University.  While organizations from the NAACP to CORE lobbied for the students to join their ranks, Baker offered students a different perspective.  She told them to build their own organization.  They agreed with her and formed the group that would become SNCC.  While I certainly cannot do justice to the legacy of SNCC in this post, there are many sources I would encourage you to explore.  First among these is Charles Payne’s I’ve Got the Light of Freedom in which he describes eloquently the impact of this organization.

SNCC initiated the mass-based, disruptive political style we associate with the sixties, and it provided philosophical and organizational models and hands on training for people who would become leaders in the student power movement, the anti-war movement, and the feminist movement

This formation of this dynamic group was made possible by the mentorship of Ella Baker.

Knowing the legacy of Ms. Baker brings with it a responsibility to carry on and fulfill her mission.  She envisioned a movement which would be led not by ministers or the privileged, but by the people who most needed it.  She recognized the importance of nonviolent direct action and encouraged activist to take up the work of building collectives that would be capable of meeting injustice head on.  She believed in the importance of organizing the American South and uplifting the voices of the working class, young people, and people of color. In the end she hoped to build a society of cooperation and collective action which brought her back to the interdependent community of her youth. As Payne states in his book, the complex political legacy of SNCC “went back at least as far as Miss Baker’s grandfather’s farm.”  The question now is how much further we can carry it.

-MH

Feminist Students United (FSU) is a progressive feminist organization which affirms that no form of oppression can be overcome until all aspects of racism, classism, sexism, and heterosexism are dismantled. We acknowledge intersecting identities and strive to be mindful of these intersections in all our work. We endeavor to create an environment which is non-hierarchical and supportive in nature, and we work to bring about change in our community through education, outreach, direct action and community organizing.

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Spring 2015: Wednesdays at 7:30 PM in Murphey 202

For a better look at events, check out FSU's Calendar

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contact us

uncfsu AT gmail (dot) com